Tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11. SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Study Questions 2019-02-13

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To Kill a Mockingbird Study Guide Questions

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

Dubose, or makes them obey Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra. That is not always a good thing, of course, because it can be hard for a person to see the value of growth and change. It is always rather ambiguous, and it is possible to miss much of what is going on. Dill cries at the cross-examination of Tom. What do they learn in the process? Statements of opinion should be followed by reference to events or use of quotation; quotation should be followed by explanation if needed and comment. In her account of Mayella's testimony Scout refers to “a Mr.

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To Kill A Mockingbird Study Guide Questions Chapters 1

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

Scout is puzzled by this remark and asks Miss Maudie Atkinson about it. Do not, however, merely retell narrative the story without comment. . In a novel with a huge cast of characters, there is no reason to avoid using stereotypes in every case. When he goes to retrieve them, he sees that they have been mended, inexpertly.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Study Guide Questions

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

In each case, you can see more of the quotation by clicking on the short extract. To Kill a Mockingbird explores the questions of innocence and harsh experience, good and evil, from several different angles. In the trial of O. Does it have any connection with themes earlier in the novel and in its ending? By presenting the blacks of Maycomb as virtuous victims—good people made to suffer—Lee makes her moral condemnation of prejudice direct, emphatic, and explicit. Harper Lee was born in Monroeville, Alabama, which may be the model for the fictional Maycomb.


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To Kill A Mockingbird Study Guide Questions Chapters 1

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

Attitudes in the text In this story, we see a huge range of attitudes displayed by different characters. In the novel, while we associate the mockingbird generally with weak and defenceless people, there are two characters who are more explicitly likened to the bird. How does she fit into the Finch household? In doing this you should refer to her narrative methods. Discuss whether you think it right for young people to be able to witness criminal trials. Was this a wise thing to ask her to do? At the start of the novel the brief reference to Boo arouses the reader's interest. Boo in the first part of the novel Scout tells the reader a lot about Boo in the early part of the novel, but he disappears from the narrative for most of the middle and later chapters, which are concerned with the story of the trial and its sequel. An editorial is a section in a newspaper which does not give news, but comments on it and interprets it.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

In the account of the visit to First Purchase, Scout records the distinctive speech of the coloured people - noting with particular interest the way Calpurnia switches into this non-standard variety. About the novel To Kill a Mockingbird was first published in 1960. Sheriff Tate knows the real course of events, more or less, but sees a way to make Boo's weapon appear to be the one Bob Ewell had, while removing Bob Ewell's knife from the investigation altogether. It's a sin and I'm not about to have it on my head. And when Scout thinks she hears laughter from inside the Radley house, she finds this sinister - but the reader comes to see that this is the innocent laughter of Boo Radley, who is amused by the children at play.

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To Kill A Mockingbird Study Guide Questions Chapters 1

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

Comparison This story is full of comparisons and contrasts. Underwood's editorial in the Maycomb Tribune, following Tom's death. It is inferred from the sounds Scout hears and what Heck Tate discovers at the scene. Perhaps only a woman can be so tough in depicting her own sex in this respect, Harper Lee writes rather in the manner of Jane Austen. Tate completely, when she says: “Well, it'd be sort of like shootin' a mockingbird, wouldn't it? Dubose's camellias and has to read to her.

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To Kill a Mocking Bird Chapter 16

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

At the time the reader may think this is the wild laughter of a dangerous madman. Chapter 9 Defending Tom Robinson. You may wish to alter things or exaggerate for dramatic or comic effects. You should be aware, though, that it was written for adult readers. Sheriff Tate went to the Ewell house and observed that Mayella was bruised. Conner in the court outhouse.

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To Kill A Mockingbird Study Guide Questions Chapters 1

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird. Is it usual for white lawyers to do their best for black clients in Alabama at this time? What reason does he give for saying this? Can you find anything in the text that suggests this? Although these questions are explored to some degree before the trial, they dominate the novel after the trial. Explain why Harper Lee chooses to end the first part here. The crowd is so large that there really is nowhere for everyone to eat lunch, so they all camp out in the town square. What reasons does she give for this view? Can you find qualities which would make her good or not so good at her job? Heck Tate proves that it was Boo. When he thinks wrongly that Jem has killed Bob Ewell, he insists that the “best way to clear the air is to have it all out in the open”. She does not confine the narrative to things that she has directly experienced - for example she recounts stories from the history of Simon Finch, and repeats what other people tell her.

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SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Study Questions

tkam study guide questions and answers 1 11

When Nathan Radley stops up the knot-hole, it is a fairly clear sign that he knows what Arthur has been doing and wants to stop it. As the narrator she makes comments about how reliable other people's accounts are - so we allow for any distortion or exaggeration, as appropriate Miss Stephanie, for example, is likely to exaggerate. Heck Tate works out what has happened, and conceals Bob Ewell's flick-knife, in order to maintain that the kitchen knife was Ewell's weapon, on which he fell. Below are some headings with suggested comments - you can use these to organize your writing. You should base this on a true account, though you may wish to change some details to make it more interesting. For example, that he “likened it to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children”. There are plenty of characters, from Atticus to Dolphus Raymond, from Miss Maudie to Boo Radley, who do not conform to any stereotype.


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