Maharashtra floods of 2005 case study. Maharashtra floods of 2005 2019-02-26

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Kerala: ‘With 3,200 dams, Maharashtra at risk of Kerala

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

The project, if implemented would have doubled the storm water carrying capacity to 50 mm per hour. There was a huge loss of infrastructure and man power. The floods were caused by the eighth heaviest, ever recorded 24-hour rainfall figure of 944 mm 37. District Collector Pravin Darade and Resident District Collector Milind Pathak played a key role in flood relief work. Doctors from Army Medical Corps, and nurses from the Military Nursing Service were amongst the lead elements to be deployed in the area. A large number of people were stranded on the roads, lost their homes while many walked long distances back home from work that evening.

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Maharashtra floods of 2005 explained

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Destruction of mangrove ecosystems s which exist along the and Mahim Creek are being destroyed and replaced with construction. The drainage plans in northern suburbs is chalked out as and when required in a particular area and not from an overall point of view. As on today rehabilitation work is going on which is supposed to be completed in 2015. The process of urbanisation has played a major role in aggravating the problem as it causes significant alterations to the hydrology, morphology, habitat and ecology of an area. The floods in 1994 stand out in recent memory in this sugarcane-rich district of south Maharashtra.

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Several parts of Maharashtra face flood like situation

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Trade and Commerce: The most extensive loss had been suffered by the trade and commerce sector. Hoardings were put up at prominent places, picture slides with instructions were shown in cinema halls, pamphlets were distributed, educative radio talks were held on flood disaster and the community-based methods of tackling it. About 7 lakh children were being provided text books in the government, municipal and even unaided schools. Popular hill station Mahabaleshwar experienced 250 mm rainfall in last 24 hours. The airports reopened on the morning of 28 July 2005. India which has different types of vegetation and geography witnesses almost all the kinds of disasters most common among them all being floods.

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(PDF) Description and impacts of the Mumbai monsoon flood of July 2005

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Normal life was badly affected in most parts of Maharashtra due to continuous rains for the last four days. Following this event, 35 state-of-the-art automatic weather stations comprising of tipping bucket rain gauges were installed at 33 locations in the municipal limits and one ultrasonic flow gauge on the Mithi River. Threat to public health The rain water caused the to overflow and all water lines were contaminated. Local train movement came to a halt by 2:30 p. Climatic data for 64 stations are tabulated in the appendix.

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Maharashtra floods of 2005

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Thousands of school children were stranded due to flooding and could not reach home for up to 24 hours. Further, the city has become extremely vulnerable due to a large number of people living in huts in low-lying areas, particularly in the bed of Mithi river. Killed 20,000, injured 30,000 and destroyed about 52 villages. Uncontrolled, unplanned development in Northern Suburbs Development in certain parts of Mumbai is haphazard and buildings are constructed without proper planning. Aromar Revi 2005 draws lessons from the floods for prioritizing multi-hazard risk mitigation. Hundreds of of swamps in Mahim creek have been reclaimed and put to use for construction by builders.

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Maharashtra: A Case Study for Flood Management by Shyam Pandharipande

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Presentation gives brief about Mumbai 26 July 2005 flood case study- Introduction, Factors aggravated for flood, casualty damage, rescue. The drainage system was also clogged at several places. Only 3 'outfalls' ways out to the sea are equipped with floodgates whereas the remaining 102 open directly into the sea for more than 24 hours. Preliminary indications indicate that the floods caused a direct loss of about 5. Uncontrolled, unplanned development in Northern Suburbs Development in certain parts of Mumbai is haphazard and buildings are constructed without proper planning. Local train movement came to a halt by 2:30 p.

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Maharashtra floods of 2005

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Disaster losses manifest themselves in numerous ways and can never be estimated with absolute certainty. The incidence of leptospirosis in Mumbai and Kalyan-Dombivali was, however, a subject of serious concern. The rainfall was 440% above the normal. The Government had issued advisories for treating leptospirosis and made arrangements for beds in all the government and private hospitals for treating the patients. Presentation gives brief about Mumbai 26 July 2005 flood case study- Introduction, Case study mumbai floods 2005 aggravated for flood, casualty damage, rescue.

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Secret Bases • 2005 Maharashtra floods

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Kalyan, Dombivali, Ambarnath, Ulhasnagar, and Bhiwandi, which were part of the urban agglomeration, were under flood waters. It deployed the Army, Air Force and Navy for the search and rescue operations. Over 10,000 troops participated in Operation Surya Hope. Over 700 flights were cancelled or delayed. The water levels in dams should be stored after a thorough study of the rain pattern.

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Maharashtra floods of 2005 explained

maharashtra floods of 2005 case study

Uncontrolled, unplanned development in Northern Suburbs Development in certain parts of Mumbai is haphazard and buildings are constructed without proper planning. The floods were caused by the eighth heaviest-ever recorded 24-hour rainfall figure of 944 mm 37. The influx of labour and other work force over the last two decades has resulted in the total population of the metropolitan and the surrounding suburbs to increase from 9. If we see the recent floods in uttarakhand then also we are able to see that because of lack of proper management and preventive methods we lost around 10,000 lives and a huge chunk of money invested as in capital form or in infrastructure, which tells that we are complete failure on the economic front of natural disaster also. Our union and states are complete failure in ensuring the safety or prevention from disaster. Naturally, disasters that affect densely populated areas have the greatest potential for inflicting the most damage because not only are large numbers of people endangered, but the potential loss to homes, roads, bridges, businesses, highways and utilities is also magnified. Ironically, in partial trading, the , India's most tracked closed at an all-time high of 7605.

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